Casual winter Dress French Boutique Connection

Boutique Casual Connection winter French Dress 8xrxq7t

Boutique Track Jacket Jacket Boutique Volcom winter winter Track Volcom SxU1wvqqIT

Discussion in 'English Only' started by prankstare, Oct 24, 2008.

  1. I've just had an essay activity in classroom today, -- wasn't really an essay-essay though, you know, more of a random text composition whatsoever -- and it was something like really fast (about 8 minutes to do it). After time's up, the teacher perused each student's text. When she read my text, she made some remarks; one of them in particular was the use of 'most definitely'. She says that 'most definitely' cannot be used both together like this way, so she asked me which to be removed (whether "most" or "definitely"). Here's the bit:
    Jacket The Ahead Territory Boutique winter gIBxqgP
    " If I were to choose between having a congenital hearing or visual disability, being only either one or the other, I'd Connection Boutique Dress winter Casual French most definitely prefer to have the hearing capacities."

    So, what do you guys think? Any other mistake?
     
  2. cropje_jnr Senior Member

    Canberra, Australia
    English - Australia
    I disagree with your teacher. To me 'most definitely' is a common phrase and is quite correct.
     
  3. Hi,
    I've found many people often use definitely only.
    But if you search "most definitely" on Google, there are more than 5 million results.
     
  4. cropje_jnr Senior Member

    Canberra, Australia
    English - Australia
    Exactly. 'Most definitely' is a common way of further emphasising your certainty about something.
     
  5. Perhaps it's something essay examiners don't like reading in formal writings?
     
  6. Nymeria Senior Member

    Barbados
    English - Barbadian/British/educated in US universities blend
    Perhaps your teacher is trying to make the point that the word "definitely" is not a word that should be qualified. Somethings is either definite or not. It cannot be more or less definite because definite is absolute by definition. If she is looking at it like that, then she has a valid point. Just because it is common doesn't make it correct.
     
  7. Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    I probably would not use the "most definitely" myself in this sentence, but it's not terrible. "Most" is often used to emphasize "definitely." Would you like to go to the movies? Most definitely. (Not a great example, but serviceable.

    As for "other mistakes," the sentence has more serious problems.

    " If I were to choose between having a congenital hearing or visual disability, being only either one or the other, I'd most definitely prefer to have the hearing capacities."

    First, you don't need the red phrase. You've already established that it's a choice between one or the other, so the phrase is superfluous.

    Second, you were suppose to choose which disability you would rather have, but you've told us which capacity you prefer, which confuses the issue. As I tend to shout during television interviews with politicians -- Answer the question!
     
  • Nymeria Senior Member

    Barbados
    English - Barbadian/British/educated in US universities blend
    Well since you asked so nicely:

    Yeah, I am usually superfluous when it comes to writing. Perhaps it's just a way of trying to make it sound more formal or classy. It seems like most of the time the sentences end up being overly long or wrong in terms of structure, or I don't make sense at all.

    Connection winter Boutique Casual French Dress
    But thank you 'Copyright' for pointing out the other mistakes and for being so comprehensive with your reasons. Correct me any time, anyone! I'd appreciate if people would do this with every post of mine on this forum.
     

  • Hehe, yeah!

    That's what I'm talking about.

    Cheers!
     

  • Just because someone somewhere sometime has concocted a rule out of thin air, despite the contrary evidence of millions of native speakers, does not make it correct either.
     
  • Nymeria Senior Member

    Barbados
    English - Barbadian/British/educated in US universities blend
    What is the rule that was "concocted" out of "thin air"?
     
  • ewie Senior Member

    Elsewhere
    English English
    That some words are 'absolute' ~ I forget the exact technical term, it came up just the other day ~ i.e. cannot be qualified in any way: fairly unique, wholly incomplete, etc.
     
  • abenr Senior Member

    Scottsdale, AZ, USA
    English, USA
    "Most definitely" is so commonly used these days in the US that to call it an error is grossly pedantic. Use it all you want, but evidently not with this teacher.
     
  • Cagey post mod (English Only / Latin)

    California
    English - US
    I think the technical term is - what is it now? - ah, yes "absolute". (And I agree with you.)

    Here is a sensible discussion of the use of modifiers and comparatives with "absolute terms" from the American Heritage Guide to Contemporary English. It points out:
    People object to these constructions because they seem to violate the categories of logic. Something is either complete or it isn’t. [....] There can be no in-between. The mistake here is to confuse pure logic or a mathematical ideal with the working approximations that distinguish the ordinary use of language.
    Here is Fowler himself using a comparative with "definitely" (underline added).
    T O use individual wrongly in the twentieth century stamps a writer, more definitely than almost any other single solecism, .... Fowler's Kings English, 1908.
    Whether or not to use " most definitely" in the original sentence seems to me to be a stylistic question, not a question of grammar.
     
  • ewie Senior Member

    Elsewhere
    English English
  • Nymeria Senior Member

    Barbados
    English - Barbadian/British/educated in US universities blend
    Silk Tommy Boutique Hilfiger Blazer leisure v8x7t
    True though that may be gentlemen, too far east is west. It is one thing to say that the rule is over-applied in some instances, but I disagree with the idea that it has no merit at all. That is the impression that I got given that it was referred to as concocted out of thin air. Correct me if I have misinterpreted you.

    It is true that some words, by definition, are absolute (such as the word "absolute" itself ). The fact that this remains topic of debate instead of one that has been settled aeons ago leads me to believe that grammarians on both sides of the divide have points worth taking into account.
     
  • George French Senior Member

    English - UK
    Most definitely it wastes time and ink and keeps us in front of our computers. It is most definitely wrong to use most definitely!

    GF..

    Time to go to bed.... and not get involved in this sort of thread....
     
  • Mmm, okay.
     
  • I'd undoubtedly prefer the hearing impairment.
     

  • As easy as it looks, hehe.

    I'd love to disclose my reasons as for choosing the visual impairment instead as presented along in my "mini" essay. It is kind of a bit long and unnecessary reading though, so I'll spare you this time around.
     
  • boomcrash New Member

    I think this is the reasoning. I consider the phrase 'most definitely' to be somewhat of a slang expression, something to be spoken among friends, but not used in formal settings, for all the reasons everyone's thus far given.
     
  • Hey. Perhaps it's just a case of uncertainty.

    I was just posting another message on a different thread here and I wrote "almost certainly", which somewhat made me remember about "most definitely" - because as my teacher said to me, it must be either most or definitely but never them both together.
     
  • I don't have any problem with "most definitely prefer", but I'm not sure what you mean by it. I think a "definite preference" would be a clear, distinct preference, and "most definite" would mean "clearest and most distinct", or "most clear and distinct", so "most definitely" has to mean "most clearly and distinctly". Is that what you mean?
     
  • I don't have any problem with "most definitely prefer", but I'm not sure what you mean by it. I think a "definite preference" would be a clear, distinct preference, and "most definite" would mean "clearest and most distinct", or "most clear and distinct", so "most definitely" has to mean "most clearly and distinctly". Is that what you mean?
    Click to expand...

    Ohh, I think I messed up the two up there. Sorry.

    Yeah, I think your post is clear: "most definitely" does not give the impression of uncertainty as "almost certainly" does. Rather, it might just be sort of repetitive or excessive or superfluous or whatever grammarians would name it - I don't really know how to call this.
     
  • Last edited: Oct 26, 2008
  • Hi, Prankstare.

    Are you saying you thought most meant "almost" (= nearly)?

    Sometimes it does, but only where it can't be a superlative (e.g. "most all" = "almost all").

    "Most definitely" does not mean "almost definitely". It means so definitely that more definitely is impossible.

    Does that make sense?
     

  • Mmm, okay. Yeah that makes sense.

    Like say " Most of all the grades were low", meaning not entirely all the grades but most of them.
     
  • No. "Most all the grades" means "almost all the grades", which I think is more than "most of (all) the grades". But that's a topic for another thread.
     

  • Hum,

    OK.
     
  • Share This Page

    Boutique Casual Connection winter French Dress 8xrxq7t Boutique Casual Connection winter French Dress 8xrxq7t
    Loading...
    Materials 95% Viscose, 5% Spandex
    Connection French winter Casual Boutique Dress